New eBook: Christmas Chums

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Clip and Shallo, along with Tristan and Chantal, learn how to work out their differences in order to enjoy Christmas to the full.
Click here to download this Christmas ebook in epub or mobi format.

 

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Treasure Attic: Christmas Friends

This fun, festive Christmas edition of Treasure Attic is full of excitement, songs and surprises to thrill young hearts as they discover the miracle and meaning of Christmas.

Treasure Attic – Christmas Friends from L. R. on Vimeo.

A Spiritual Exercise: Opening the Door

Spiritual exercise for children for Christmas - opening the door of your heart

Examine the door upon which Jesus is knocking. There is no handle. It symbolizes the door of your heart, which can only be opened from the inside. Have you opened your life to Jesus? He will not force His way in. You must open the door yourself.

“Behold, I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears My voice and opens the door, I will come in to him and dine with him, and he with Me.” (Revelation 3:20)

If you have invited Jesus into your life, how welcome do you make Him feel? What place do you give Him now?

To help you answer this question, think about the other members of your household. You greet them in the morning. You are considerate of their happiness and comfort. When friends visit, you introduce them. You sit together and talk. You eat at the same table. How rude it would be to ignore them or to forget their presence.

As you remember Jesus’ birth this month, think about the place that Jesus has in the house of your life.


Image by Evans E/Flickr. Text adapted from Activated magazine.

Christmas Videos for the Whole Family

Free Christmas movies and videos for the whole familyCheck out this updated list of free Christmas movies, cartoons, shows and music videos for children of all ages. All links have been updated and new videos have been added to the list for your enjoyment!


Image by Freepik

Prince Jonathan’s Integrity

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Prince Jonathan, the son of Israel’s first anointed king, is an amazing example in the Bible of honor and integrity. Think about it: he was logically expected to succeed his father, King Saul, as king—but the prophet Samuel anointed the boy David instead.

Now, if I were in Jonathan’s position, I think I would have succumbed in one of two ways. Either I would have become consumed with envy, feeling that I had been dealt an unjust hand. Or I would have not cared about the affairs of the kingdom from then on.

But what did Jonathan do? For as long as he remained a prince, he was the best prince that he could be, right up until the end when he died fighting a doomed battle.1 Even while he filled his role of prince, he also honored and protected the future king, David, on numerous occasions.

I don’t think Jonathan saw ruling Israel as a self-serving opportunity. He didn’t seem to care who was king, as long as they led the country in God’s ways. He put his full weight behind David, God’s anointed, simply because he was God’s anointed. That takes integrity—the kind of deep-seated integrity that comes from complete confidence in God’s providence.

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There’s nothing wrong with aspiring to be good at what we do and receiving recognition for it, but we can become disheartened and discontent if we belittle our own place in life and long for a seemingly more preeminent position. Certainly, there are many individuals who excel in positions of great usefulness or prominence. But many of us fill a place in life that would be considered more common and ordinary. Nevertheless, we are each given valuable hidden skills that can be developed in our current circumstances. And when we accept our situation and do all we can in it, we will often find ourselves developing those hidden or formerly dormant talents, which we can then use to help others. This in turn brings us contentment and fulfillment.

No place or position is really common or ordinary if it is the place and position God meant us to have, and where He meant for us to develop our unique skills.


Art by Rene Pfitzner. Text courtesy of Activated magazine.